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Update: I know, I know.. It’s been more than a “couple” of days!  Many humble apologies for keeping you waiting!  The following auction listings will be posted tomorrow!  (That’s November 11.)  Thank you for your patience. ❤

 

In the next couple of days, I will be posting some drawings on eBay.  Normally, if someone doesn’t claim them before the sealant is dry, I post paintings and drawings for sale on the main website.  But, since I originally started off selling some on eBay years ago, I thought it’d be a nice bit of nostalgia to list them that way again.   And, it’s a way of saying “thank you” to my supporters.   The starting bids will be affordable, and I have not done a lot of publicizing, so there’s a chance to get some deals!

Each drawing is in ebony pencil, on 9×12 sketch paper with smudge resistant clear coat.

Here’s a preview of some of the listings– the “S.Lynnette” watermarks are not part of the drawings.  🙂

Dairy Barn Pencil Drawing

Illustration of a southeastern Virginia dairy barn by S.Lynnette.

Virginia Barn Pencil Drawing

Illustration of a southeastern Virginia barn by S.Lynnette.

Lighthouse Pencil Drawing

Ebony pencil drawing on 9x12in. acid-free sketch paper. Lighthouse, by S.Lynnette

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Remember when I said I have some good news to share?

After years of refusing to create anything, in spite of my nudges to get back to drawing and painting, my mother would not return to making art.  Until now.

For many years, my mother was a professional artist, and was very good at it.  However, after she became ill, she stopped creating.  It’s rarely a good sign when an artist stops creating.  I nudged, I pestered, I gently requested, I nagged.  She refused to create.

But, she recently picked up a camera and started making photos.  When I saw them, I suggested letting me post some of them online, and she’s agreed to it.  Yay!  The plan is to add some of them this week, along with the photos of the new framed 4 leaf clovers.

When I asked how she wanted to be credited, she said “Just use my name… *Mom*”, and grinned.  So, that is how they will be credited when I post them.

Then she said something that nearly brought tears to my eyes.

“I want to put the money toward your student loans.”

The student loans I accumulated in college weigh heavy on me, even though my current payment arrangement seems pretty fair.  The interest is piling on faster than I can pay the bill, and the debt just keeps growing.  It’s my only large debt, and it keeps getting larger, even though I have been out of school for several years now.  It’s one of the things that keeps me awake some nights, and it’s one of the reasons I have been doing fewer charity auctions.

It’s interesting that we are judged no matter what we do.  If we do not go to college and end up struggling, people will say “you should have gone to college”.  If we go to college and end up struggling, people will say “you should have just gotten a ‘real’ job”.  This really has nothing to do with the rest of the story, though.  Just a passing observation of “damned if you do, damned if you don’t” in action.

Of course, now, in spite of the realization that it is so great that my mother is creating again, and it is so touching that she wants to use that to help with one of my biggest stressors, it upsets me that my stress has washed into her thoughts.  My student loans are not something she should be worrying about.  But, if that’s what makes her start creating art again, I suppose I’ll take that.

But the whole situation got me thinking about how many others are in the same boat.  We’re not allowed to file bankruptcy on student loans.  There is an income-based repayment plan, but it does not leave the debtor anything for savings.  They can defer the loans, but only for a couple of years during the entire life of the loan.  And, the debts count as assets for the lenders, similar to the way the housing loans counted as assets a few years ago.  It all seems like a dangerous mix on a large scale.

So, I started this petition: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/483/761/623/

Someone asked, “Do you think it’ll do anything?”

I have no idea.  It was born of frustration, and I do not even know how many people will see it.  Currently, at 23 signatures, the petition has already exceeded my expectations, and with so many who are struggling with student loans, I’m sure there will be more signatures.

I’m not sure what happens when we tug at this thread.  I know I would much rather pay off my student loans than file bankruptcy.  But it isn’t fair to trap so many people in excessive debt either, especially when education is for the betterment of everyone– or at least, it is supposed to be.  So, sign the petition and share it.

 


Some readers have noticed it has been quite some time since my last post, and since the website was last updated.  While I’d like to say I was away on some exotic photo shoot or relaxing at an art retreat, the truth is I have been struggling with a severe bout of depression.

When my grandfather passed away a little over 2 years ago, I was able to repress the grief for some time, but then finally the realization came– he is gone.

As a small child, I sat on his lap during church services, drawing on the church bulletin.  He is one of the biggest reasons I eventually chose to study and create art, because those early memories are among the best I have.  Since his passing, most attempts to paint or draw have only reminded me of how much I miss him.  I was on the brink of throwing in the towel, tossing out the art supplies, burning whatever paintings remain, and closing the website, not because I do not want to continue this line of work, but simply because at times it just felt like too much to take on in the midst of depression.

However, my supporters, friends, and clients have been determined to drag me out of my mental muck, and for that I am thankful.  From the friend who reminded me that the portrait of his dog still means so much to him even after more than a decade, to the stranger who ordered some of my ornaments on Zazzle knowing her loved ones will have and cherish them even after she is gone (hopefully many, many years from now), to the customers who ordered lucky clovers to give a boost to their own friends– all of you have helped me to realize… it is not really about me.  It is about leaving the world in better condition than it was in when I arrived, and how my work makes others think and feel.  In other words…  It is about all of you!

So for now, I am putting away my self-pity to make room for more new art & photography, more new additions to the Zazzle store, more auction listings, more 4 leaf clovers, and eventually more “Nonprofit of the Month” posts.  And, the main website should be updated soon, so be sure to check out http://soulbearing.com for the latest art & photography releases and lucky clovers, and for links to order prints of my work from Zazzle.

And, because all of you allow and encourage me to keep doing what I do, you have my eternal gratitude.

Thank You.


Two new abstract art paintings have been posted at soulbearing.com!!

Unraveling the Unknown is a hypnotic composition of spirals and swirls in reds, yellows, oranges, and blues, ready to hang in your home or office to mesmerize guests and visitors.

The Life of a Spark is a high contrast, action-packed mix of vibrant yellows and blues, with a splash of orange– perfect for lovers of anything intense and unusual.

Both paintings are great for anyone looking to add a unique pop of colour to home or business.

Fans of vibrant colour, motion, and expressionism will love these.  And, no additional charge for shipping!!

unraveling the unknown, abstract art painting

unraveling the unknown, abstract art painting

the life of a spark, abstract art painting

the life of a spark, abstract art painting


My dear readers, your intrepid artist has had the flu and spent a large portion of the past 3 weeks whimpering and shivering under a pile of blankets, sucking down copious amounts of orange juice and cough syrup. Seriously, this season’s flu is brutal. Don’t catch it. It took weeks to recover, and any orders placed through soulbearing.com and eBay were being handled and shipped by a courageous temporary helper, in order to avoid passing along any germs to my beloved patrons.  But now I’m good as new and the studio has been thoroughly disinfected… and I’ve been busy.

There have been THOUSANDS of new items added to the soulbearing zazzle store; the total number of image/product combinations is now nearing 8,000. And, there is something for virtually everyone, whether you’re a fan of abstract expressionism, symmetrical designs, rural and nature photography, or floral photography.  Find fabulous original designs on household items, skins and cases for electronics, tshirts, accessories, cards and postage, office products, and art prints & posters.

Looking for the real four leaf clovers? Those are still available too!! Thanks to the mild winters here, they grow almost year round, and you can find them in frames at soulbearing.com or in pendants via the eBay auctions.

Real 4 Leaf Clover Necklace Pendant

Real 4 Leaf Clover Necklace Pendant

Also, there are more new paintings on the way, in plenty of time to give your home or office an art makeover for the New Year!! Posters and prints are great, but there is nothing quite like an original painting’s colour and texture.

Life is Never Still, Blue Abstract Art Painting on Canvas

Life is Never Still, Blue Abstract Art Painting on Canvas

And you can find links to it all at soulbearing.com, which conveniently accepts PayPal. So, show your love, get great merchandise and art, and feed an artist this holiday season.

Happy shopping!!  🙂


The short answer is “neither is better or worse; they’re just different”.  For a longer more biased answer, along with some tips for beginning acrylic painters, read on. 🙂 

While some artists insist on using traditional oil paints, there have also been many very well-known artists who have worked with acrylics.  If you don’t believe me, “google” it!  Personally, I prefer working with acrylics for several reasons.  

Once upon a time, acrylic paint was used almost exclusively for commercial painting, and because of this it was specifically formulated to have a short drying time and low cost.  Over the years, it has evolved, and now several manufacturers are making fine art quality acrylics in a wide range of pigments and consistencies, with slower drying time than the commercial-use acrylics– and a higher price. 

Since acrylics are still relatively new on the art scene (only 50-60 years), it’s hard to say what acrylic paintings will look like in another 200 years.  But, so far most acrylic fine art paintings seem to endure without the cracking seen in many oil paintings of comparable age, they maintain color as well or even better, and acrylic paints seem to be more versatile than oils.  They come in smooth body, heavy body, extra heavy body.  You can thin them, thicken them, pour them, brush them, embed objects, use texturizers, etc. etc. etc.  And, wet acrylic paint cleans up with soap and water, which means no need for turpentine! 

Many oil painters complain that acrylics dry too fast, but this is one of the qualities I like most.  A thick coat of oil paint can take many weeks to thoroughly dry, while the same work in acrylic is dry within hours or even minutes.  If acrylics dry too fast for you, my initial advice is “paint faster”.  However, there are steps you can take to slow the drying process. 

For starters, you can make your own palette using a shallow plastic container, a damp cloth, and a sheet of wax paper.  Place the damp cloth in the bottom of the container, with the wax paper on top of the cloth, and put your paint on top of the wax paper.  This can keep paint useable for many hours.  And, if the container also has a lid, this can keep acrylic paint useable for days, as long as you keep the cloth damp (only damp, not dripping — too much water on the cloth will make paint runny!).  You can also buy special pallettes for acrylics at most art supply stores. 

To keep paint wet on the canvas surface for “wet on wet” painting techniques, you can add water.  However, this can make paint too thin, cause drips, and it causes the paint to have a matte finish when it dries.  Plus, even with water added, acrylics still dry fast.  An alternative is to use blending mediums, or even a combination of water and blending medium.  Liquitex makes a product called “Slow-Dri Blending Medium” which works well.  It comes in liquid and in gel form, so you can slow drying time and increase transparency without changing the consistency of your paint.  You will still have to work faster than when working with oils, but the drying retardant can buy you some time for “wet on wet” techniques.  

Whether you use oils or acrylics, the key to mastery is practice, practice, practice.  Practice and mastery are what will eventually create great works of art, regardless of the medium chosen.  

For examples of some of my acrylic paintings, visit the art for sale page.  Good luck, and happy painting!

(Originally posted by S.Lynnette on soulbearing.com, January 13, 2011 at 10:40 PM EST)


I enjoy photographing floral still lifes, rural scenery, and so on; I’m sure it shows in the quantity of these types of images in my collection.  I also enjoy painting and illustration, particularly abstracts.  This combination of interests eventually led to the question:  Can a photograph do what a painting does? (If you’re not an artsy type and don’t get it, read on anyway.  No, I’m not really going to explain, but there are important insights and links to buy stuff so I can keep painting.)

Digital photography and image editing software have made it incredibly easy for artists and amateurs alike to create attractive pictures; as evidence of this, there are literally billions of nice looking images on the internet. 

But, as an artist who prefers painting abstracts, making pretty photos can sometimes become mundane.  My solution for this has been to seek unusual angles, unusual subjects, macros, and other techniques which result in images that appear more abstract.

It started a few years ago with a photographic tribute to Jackson Pollock’s artwork.  Viewers stared curiously at the tangles of light and dark, wondering what was the inspiration for choosing to photograph these particular things, then grinned at the moment of realization that it wasn’t really about the things (It rarely really is.).

This led to more images done in tribute to other abstract painters, like images inspired by Rothko’s glowing squares:

Minimalist Skylight by S.Lynnette

Minimalist Skylight by S.Lynnette (This image is available on a variety of products.)

Heavenly Light in the Loft by S.Lynnette

Heavenly Light in the Loft by S.Lynnette  (This image is available on a variety of products.)

Or, more recently, more images reminiscent of the abstract expressionists like Pollock:

Trees in the Snow

Trees in the Snow by S.Lynnette  (This one is available in large prints on canvas! and a variety of other products.)

Of course, I haven’t given up the floral and rural photography.  I do still like pretty pictures:

2011 Floral Calendar

2011 Floral Calendar by S.Lynnette (Nature and Rural Calendars and other products are also available.)

And some images are even available on jewelry now:

Owl Necklace by S.Lynnette

Owl Necklace by S.Lynnette

So if you see the abstract art and photography, and think to yourself “What on earth is that?”, don’t panic.  I still haven’t completely given up making pretty pictures.  If you’d like to see more, you can shop for merchandise printed with my images, or better yet, shop for original art.

(Originally posted by S.Lynnette on soulbearing.com, December 29, 2010 at 06:00 PM EST)

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